Prison Policy Initiative

The non-profit, non-partisan Prison Policy Initiative produces cutting edge research to expose the broader harm of mass criminalization, and then sparks advocacy campaigns to create a more just society.

 

Description

NORTHAMPTON, MA – EIN 203671130  prisonpolicy.org

The Prison Policy Initiative’s research and advocacy is at the center of the national conversation about criminal justice reform and over-criminalization. Because essential national and state level data is often completely inaccessible, the Prison Policy Initiative’s insightful data analysis and powerful graphics help fill these gaps to bring in new supporters and help other movement leaders achieve their goals.

WHO WE ARE
Peter Wagner co-founded the Prison Policy Initiative in 2001 to document and publicize how mass incarceration punishes our entire society. Our staff members shape national reform campaigns from our office in Western Massachusetts.

OUR BIGGEST VICTORIES
The Prison Policy Initiative is known for delivering big results with a small budget, including:

– Empowering our movement with the big picture with Mass Incarceration: The Whole Pie. This ground-breaking report assembles data on everyone who is incarcerated or confined in different kinds of prisons, jails, and other correctional and detention facilities in the U.S. The main graphic has become the most widely-used visual in the field.

– Giving advocates in every state — even those with relatively progressive policies — the message, data and visuals they need to show that their state’s use of incarceration is out of line with the international community.

– Bringing fairness to the prison and jail phone industry. Some children had to pay $1/minute for a call home from an incarcerated parent. Our research and advocacy led the Federal Communications Commission to lower the cost of calls home from prisons and jails.

– Demonstrating that incarceration in every state — even those with relatively progressive policies — is out of line with the international community with the report and interactive graphic States of Incarceration: The Global Context.

– Protecting our democracy from the undue influence of the prison system. Our campaign against prison gerrymandering has changed how legislative districts are drawn in nine states and 200+ municipalities.

– Protecting family visits from the predatory video call industry that seeks to replace traditional in-person visits with expensive video chats. We’ve put this predatory industry on the national agenda and we’ve won in Massachusetts, California, Texas, Illinois, and Portland, Oregon.
When the federal government stopped publishing state-level racial disparity data for prisons and jails in 2006, we found a way to fill that gap and give state-advocates the data they need to hold their state accountable.

Wiki

Prison Policy Initiative

Prison Policy Initiative
AbbreviationPPI
MottoPrison Policy Initiative put the problem of mass incarceration — and the perverse incentives that fuel it — on the national agenda.
Formation2001
TypePublic policy think tank
HeadquartersNorthampton, MA, United States
Executive Director
Peter Wagner
Revenue (2014)
$299,634[1]
Expenses (2014)$269,400[1]
Websitewww.prisonpolicy.org

The Prison Policy Initiative (PPI) is a criminal justice oriented American public policy think tank based in Easthampton, Massachusetts. It is a non-profit organization, designated 501(c)(3) by the IRS. It is the "leading public critic"[2] of the United States Census Bureau's practice of counting prisoners as residents of the towns where they are incarcerated, and has conducted research in several states proving that this practice results in distortion of equal representation.

The Prison Policy Initiative's publications include "Importing Constituents: Prisoners and Political Clout in New York", "Why the Census Bureau can and must start collecting the home addresses of incarcerated people", and "Phantom constituents in the Empire State: How outdated Census Bureau methodology burdens New York counties". It has also published the Democracy Toolkit [1], an internet tool designed for rural democracy activists, allowing them to use PPI's research procedures to study their own communities.

Census work

PPI published the first empirical, district-by-district analysis of the effects of Census Bureau methodology which counts prisoners as residents of towns containing prisons, not their pre-incarceration addresses, and has since been the leading critic of the practice (which it calls "prisoner miscount") and the distortion of equal representation it causes. Executive director Peter Wagner has testified on the issue before the National Academies and the New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Apportionment. The Census Bureau's scientific advisors at the United States National Research Council have now recommended that the Bureau begin to collect prisoners' home address information, and the New York Times editorial board has repeatedly supported PPI's calls for reform.[3] Once an unknown issue, the problem of prisoner miscount has now been identified as "the most controversial issue for the 2010 census."[4]

Prison and jail telephone industry

PPI's two reports on the prison and jail phone industry explain why the industry must be regulated by the Federal Communications Commission. The reports explain that prison phone bills are so high because of a unique market failure: prison systems and local jails award monopoly contracts to the phone company that will charge the highest rates and share as much as 84% of the profits with the facility.[5] The real customers, the families paying the hefty bills, are left entirely out of the decision-making process. In fact, both parties to these contracts profit from disregarding the interests of the actual consumers of prison telephone services. Aside from the high rates, fees also have an enormous impact on prison phone bills, making up 38% of the $1 billion annual price of calling home.[6]

Jail letter bans

The Prison Policy Initiative published the first-in-the-nation report on the new jail trend of banning letters from home and requiring loved ones to write on public postcards.[7] The National Institute of Corrections called the report, "required reading for policy makers and anyone working with individuals in jail custody."[8]

Sentencing enhancement zones

Many states have laws that enhance sentences based on where an offense takes place. These laws aim to deter offenses near places such as schools, but when the protected areas are too big, the deterrence effect is lost and these policies end up increasing harmful racial disparities.[9] The Prison Policy Initiative's research demonstrated that a Massachusetts drug law that set the penalty by where the offense is located — and not the harm caused by the offense — does not work, can never work, and has serious negative effects.[10][11] The recommendations of the Prison Policy Initiative's two reports were endorsed by Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick and led to a change in the law.[12]

See also

References

External links

Videos

IRS data by ProPublica Nonprofit Explorer


PRISON POLICY INITIATIVE INC

EASTHAMPTON, MA 01027-2240 | Tax-exempt since June 2006
  • EIN: 20-3671130
  • Classification (NTEE)
    Voter Education, Registration (Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy)
  • Nonprofit Tax Code Designation: 501(c)(3)
    Defined as: Organizations for any of the following purposes: religious, educational, charitable, scientific, literary, testing for public safety, fostering national or international amateur sports competition (as long as it doesn’t provide athletic facilities or equipment), or the prevention of cruelty to children or animals.
  • Donations to this organization are tax deductible.
Fiscal year ending

June 2018

Fiscal year ending June

2018

PDF

990

Full Text

990 (filed on June 17, 2019)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

June 2017

Fiscal year ending June

2017

Full Text

990 (filed on March 6, 2018)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$762,398

Total Functional Expenses $391,815
Net income $370,583
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $723,927 95.0%
Program services $32,500 4.3%
Investment income $2,221 0.3%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $3,750 0.5%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $122,229 31.2%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $179,620 45.8%
Other
Total Assets $821,700
Total Liabilities $1,766
Net Assets $819,934
Fiscal year ending

June 2016

Fiscal year ending June

2016

Full Text

990 (filed on Aug. 7, 2017)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$372,242

Total Functional Expenses $295,177
Net income $77,065
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $318,920 85.7%
Program services $48,289 13.0%
Investment income $2,583 0.7%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $2,450 0.7%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $92,716 31.4%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $131,449 44.5%
Other
Total Assets $455,301
Total Liabilities $8,107
Net Assets $447,194
Fiscal year ending

June 2015

Fiscal year ending June

2015

PDF

990

Full Text

990 (filed on Feb. 12, 2016)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$299,634

Total Functional Expenses $269,400
Net income $30,234
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $277,563 92.6%
Program services $8,214 2.7%
Investment income $1,757 0.6%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $12,100 4.0%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $93,776 34.8%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $114,107 42.4%
Other
Total Assets $376,111
Total Liabilities $5,982
Net Assets $370,129
Fiscal year ending

June 2014

Fiscal year ending June

2014

PDF

990

Full Text

990 (filed on Feb. 18, 2015)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$429,359

Total Functional Expenses $262,214
Net income $167,145
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $204,665 47.7%
Program services $222,865 51.9%
Investment income $1,079 0.3%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $750 0.2%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $89,005 33.9%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $103,643 39.5%
Other
Total Assets $344,739
Total Liabilities $4,845
Net Assets $339,894
Fiscal year ending

June 2013

Fiscal year ending June

2013

PDF

990

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$194,016

Total Functional Expenses $250,657
Net income -$56,641
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $188,277 97.0%
Program services $4,082 2.1%
Investment income $1,657 0.9%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $190,882 76.2%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $0
Other
Total Assets $177,142
Total Liabilities $4,393
Net Assets $172,749
Fiscal year ending

June 2012

Fiscal year ending June

2012

PDF

990

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$347,771

Total Functional Expenses $273,812
Net income $73,959
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $345,618 99.4%
Program services $570 0.2%
Investment income $1,583 0.5%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $157,376 57.5%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $31,814 11.6%
Other
Total Assets $317,799
Total Liabilities $88,409
Net Assets $229,390
Fiscal year ending

June 2011

Fiscal year ending June

2011

PDF

990

Total Revenue

$265,507

Total Functional Expenses $216,772
Net income $48,735
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $264,381 99.6%
Program services $200 0.1%
Investment income $926 0.3%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $156,165 72.0%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $1,719 0.8%
Other
Total Assets $161,060
Total Liabilities $5,629
Net Assets $155,431
Fiscal year ending

June 2010

Fiscal year ending June

2010

PDF

990-EZ

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

June 2009

Fiscal year ending June

2009

PDF

990-EZ

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

June 2008

Fiscal year ending June

2008

PDF

990
IRS Filing

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

June 2007

Fiscal year ending June

2007

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.


Last Updated: 2020-11-21 07:55