National Day Laborer Organizing Network

NDLON strengthens its member organizations to be more strategic and effective in their efforts to develop leadership, site mobilize, and organize day laborers in order to protect and expand their civil, labor and human rights.

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Description

PASADENA, CA – EIN 208802586  ndlon.org

NDLON improves the lives of day laborers, migrants and low-wage workers. We build leadership and power among those facing injustice so they can challenge inequality and expand labor, civil and political rights for all.

NDLON aspires to live in a world of diverse communities where day laborers live with full rights and responsibilities in an environment of mutual respect, peace, harmony and justice.

NDLON and its member organizations are practitioners of the nonviolence teachings. Our movement for social justice follows in the footsteps of other great civil and human rights leaders such as Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Archbishop Oscar Romero, and Rosa Parks, and Cesar Chavez. We believe that nonviolent confrontation and peaceful resistance are legitimate and effective means for achieving social change and justice. More than a tactic, we embrace peace and nonviolence as a way of life.

Wiki

National Day Laborer Organizing Network

The National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON) is an American organization dedicated to improving the lives of day laborers. It was founded in Northridge, California in July 2001 and is based in Los Angeles, California. NDLON functions in a form of direct democracy where day laborers who are in member organizations vote directly for the policies at NDLON's biannual assemblies. NDLON’s vision is to live in a diverse world where day laborers have full rights in an enticement with peace, harmony, justice and mutual respect. National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON) was founded at the first national gathering of day laborer organizations. It started with 12 community-based-organizations and has grown to 36 member organizations.[1]

NDLON has been an influence in the rise of workers rights campaigns since 2000. These include the wage theft laws passed in multiple states including Illinois, New York, Ohio, Arkansas, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island.

Origins

Day laborer organizing dates back to the mid-1980s with efforts from the community to organize and educate day laborers about their rights as workers and also educate them on their civil liberties. These continued efforts in the late 1980s led to pilot programs that helped create worker centers. Around the 1990s the government became more involved in certain cities. Some supported the worker centers while others tried to get rid of the day laborer sites. During this time organizers developed a two-step approach. The first step was a litigation strategy in the courts that challenged the solicitation ordinances. The second approach was an organizing strategy that allowed day laborers to come together to have more political inclusion and be able to represent themselves in front of governmental officials, law enforcement, and local stake holders. In this time period, marked one of the first efforts to discuss day laborer rights through all the trainings and retreats. It helped develop the day laborers as leaders in their communities. In the late 1990s organizers from the different centers were all exchanging strategies and organizing practices like “libretas” that were books that were distributed to the whole country eventually. Towards the end of the decade more formal attempts were made to create a formal organization with the collaboration of all the worker centers. In 1999 a national coordinator was added and a national agenda was created which led to the creation of the NDLON.[2]

Early Creation

In August 9, 2006 after the largest immigration rights demonstrations happened, the AFL-CIO signed an agreement to work together with NDLON to improve the working conditions of immigrant day laborers. This development and the agreement were made possible because of immigrant rights activists trying to progress the rights of day laborers. Two Los Angeles community-based-organizations that helped in this historic movement were the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) and the Institute of Popular Education of Southern California(IDEPSCA) . Los Angeles has the greatest population of day laborers and these two organizations paved the way to provide day laborers the education and skills to advocate and to develop as leaders. The Los Angeles day laborer organizers developed two strategies. The first strategy was to encourage participation and self-organization among the day laborers. This leadership methodology was based on Paulo Freire principles of popular education. The second strategy was to build a relationship and reduced community conflict between the day laborers and residents and merchants. This was referred to as ”human relations”.[3] These efforts emerged from the advocates to protect the rights of the day laborers to seek work in public spaces as under the First Amendment. Framing their rights under the First amendment helped solve conflicts between the day laborers and the surrounding residents. The national network was able to emerge as worker centers throughout the different states visited each other. For example Casa Latina from Seattle and CASA of Maryland visited Los Angeles to observe the job centers. These exchanges led to the first National Day Laborer convention.

National Day Laborer Conventions

At the national Day Laborer Convention in July 2001 over 150 day laborers and organizers gathered to focus on the priorities for the network. Its priorities were defined as 1) protecting the day laborers and their civil rights, 2) creation of more day laborer worker centers, 3) expanding the education and organization of the day laborers, and 4) organizing for a legalization program that will help day laborers who are undocumented. These priorities followed on until the next Day Laborer Convention. In September 2002 the Second National Day Laborer convention was held in Silver Springs, MD at the George Meany Center of the National Labor College. In this meeting over 250 day laborers and 18 community organizations gathered to create additional priorities and to help coordinate the network. After the second convention NDLON’s capacity as a national collaboration of organizations grew and continued to grow their leadership programs that were used to engage in politics and hold a national movement. The Third day Laborer Convention was held at Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY in July 2005 in which they elected the NDLON’s Board of Director that helped NDLON on the path to become an independent organization as 501c3. In this convention they established a regional organizing strategy that will later help them respond quickly to attacks on the immigrant community. In August 2007 the fourth National Day Laborer convention was held at the George Meany Center of the National Labor College. In this convention they looked back on their accomplishments including the legislative visits, the relationship between the AFL-CIO and NDLON and the development of leadership trainings.[4]

NDLON Accomplishments

In 2005, NDLON was instrumental in defeating the Sensenbrenner Bill, aka HR4437, which was named after GOP congressman, Jim Sensenbrenner, from Wisconsin. HR4437 would have made it illegal for churches or nonprofit organizations to provide services to undocumented immigrants.

The organization has a staff of 10 and comprises 36 member organizations. Its executive director is Pablo Alvarado. In 2010, it won the Letelier-Moffitt Human Rights Award. As an immigrant worker from El Salvador, Pablo Alvarado has a special connection to predominantly poor, Latin American immigrants who have traveled far from homes in search of work to support their families. Alvarado volunteered from 1991 to 1995 as program coordinator for the Institute of Popular Education of Southern California (IDEPSCA), where he developed and implemented literacy programs for immigrants. In 2002, Alvarado became the national coordinator of the newly created National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON), currently a collaboration of about three dozen community-based day laborer organizations. Under his guidance, NDLON works with local governments to help establish worker centers to move job seekers into places of safety. There, they learn how to handle exploitation, improve skills and gain access to essential services. NDLON strengthens and expands local worker groups and builds immigrant leadership by acting as a central resource for information.

Mr. Alvarado is the recipient of the Next Generation Leadership Fellowship from the Rockefeller Foundation, which recognizes entrepreneurial, risk-taking and fair leaders who seek to develop solutions to major challenges of democracy.

In 2004, Pablo was also recognized by the Ford Foundation’s “Leadership for a Changing World Program.” In August 2005, TIME Magazine named Pablo among the 25 most influential Hispanics in the US.

Member organizations

The NDLON's member organizations include the following:

  1. American Friends Service Committee (Newark, NJ)
  2. Casa Freehold (Freehold, NJ)
  3. CASA Latina (Seattle, WA)
  4. CASA of Maryland (Silver Spring, MD)
  5. Central American Resource Center (Los Angeles, CA)
  6. Centro Cultural (Cornelius, OR)
  7. Centro Laboral de Graton (Graton, CA)
  8. (Oakland, CA)
  9. Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of L.A. (Los Angeles, CA)
  10. Centro Humanitario Para Los Trabajadores (Denver, CO)
  11. CRECEN/America Para Todos (Houston, TX)
  12. El Centro de Hospitalidad (Staten Island, NY)
  13. Gulfton Area Neighborhood Organization – CARECEN (Houston, TX)
  14. Hispanic Resource Center (Mamaroneck, NY)
  15. Iglesia San Pedro (Fallbrooks, CA)
  16. (IDEPSCA) (Los Angeles, CA)
  17. Jornaleros Unidos de Freehold (Freehold, NJ)
  18. La Raza Centro Legal (San Francisco, CA)
  19. Malibu Community Labor Exchange (Malibu, CA)
  20. Neighbors Link (Mount Kisco, NY)
  21. Pomona Economic opportunity Center -PEOC (Pomona, CA)
  22. Proyecto de los Trabajadores Latino Americanos (Brooklyn, NY)
  23. Tenants and Workers United (Falls Church,VA)
  24. The Day Worker Center at Mountain View (Mountain View, CA)
  25. The Hispanic Westchester Coalition (White Plains, NY)
  26. Tonatierra (Phoenix, AZ)
  27. Union Latina de Chicago (Chicago, IL)
  28. United Community of Westchester (NY)
  29. Voces de la Frontera (Milwaukee, WI)
  30. VOZ (Portland, OR)
  31. WeCount! (Miami, FL)
  32. Wind of the Spirit/Viento del Espiritu (Morristown, NJ)
  33. Workers Defense Project (Austin, TX)
  34. (Long Island, NY)
  35. Legal Aid Justice Center - Immigrant Advocacy Program (Virginia)
  36. Congreso de Jornaleros de Nueva Orleans (New Orleans, LA)
  37. Stamford Partnership (Stamford, CT)
  38. North Carolina Occupational Safety and Health Project (North Carolina)
  39. Hispanic Center of Ossining (Ossining, NY)
  40. Pueblo Sin Fronteras (Irving, TX)

References

  1. ^ http://www.ndlon.org
  2. ^ http://www.ndlon.orf
  3. ^ DZIEMBOWSKA, Maria. "NDLON and the History of Day Labor Organizing in Los Angeles." Social Policy 40.3 (2010): 27-33. Print.
  4. ^ http://www.ndlon.org

External links

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NATIONAL DAY LABORER ORGANIZINGNETWORK

PASADENA, CA 91105-3260 | Tax-exempt since Nov. 2007
  • EIN: 20-8802586
  • Classification (NTEE)
    Civil Liberties Advocacy (Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy)
  • Nonprofit Tax Code Designation: 501(c)(3)
    Defined as: Organizations for any of the following purposes: religious, educational, charitable, scientific, literary, testing for public safety, fostering national or international amateur sports competition (as long as it doesn’t provide athletic facilities or equipment), or the prevention of cruelty to children or animals.
  • Donations to this organization are tax deductible.
Fiscal year ending

June 2018

Fiscal year ending June

2018

PDF

990

Full Text

990 (filed on Aug. 16, 2019)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

June 2017

Fiscal year ending June

2017

PDF

990

Full Text

990 (filed on Aug. 30, 2018)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$4,069,509

Total Functional Expenses $3,436,954
Net income $632,555
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $3,877,922 95.3%
Program services $187,855 4.6%
Investment income $33 0.0%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $3,699 0.1%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $145,530 4.2%
Professional fundraising fees $13,138 0.4%
Other salaries and wages $1,246,658 36.3%
Other
Total Assets $4,663,796
Total Liabilities $659,691
Net Assets $4,004,105
Fiscal year ending

June 2016

Fiscal year ending June

2016

Full Text

990 (filed on Sept. 25, 2017)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$2,450,679

Total Functional Expenses $2,766,232
Net income -$315,553
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $2,265,147 92.4%
Program services $171,060 7.0%
Investment income $31 0.0%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $14,441 0.6%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $128,934 4.7%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $983,575 35.6%
Other
Total Assets $3,919,782
Total Liabilities $548,232
Net Assets $3,371,550
Fiscal year ending

June 2015

Fiscal year ending June

2015

PDF

990

Full Text

990 (filed on July 20, 2016)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$3,001,769

Total Functional Expenses $2,614,788
Net income $386,981
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $2,906,864 96.8%
Program services $94,867 3.2%
Investment income $38 0.0%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $119,790 4.6%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $890,125 34.0%
Other
Total Assets $3,940,869
Total Liabilities $253,766
Net Assets $3,687,103
Fiscal year ending

June 2014

Fiscal year ending June

2014

PDF

990

Full Text

990 (filed on July 16, 2015)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$2,500,760

Total Functional Expenses $2,352,624
Net income $148,136
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $2,405,100 96.2%
Program services $94,901 3.8%
Investment income $759 0.0%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $115,210 4.9%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $807,810 34.3%
Other
Total Assets $3,603,192
Total Liabilities $303,070
Net Assets $3,300,122
Fiscal year ending

June 2013

Fiscal year ending June

2013

PDF

990

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$3,695,912

Total Functional Expenses $2,603,410
Net income $1,092,502
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $3,600,599 97.4%
Program services $95,237 2.6%
Investment income $76 0.0%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $114,412 4.4%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $655,971 25.2%
Other
Total Assets $3,695,070
Total Liabilities $543,084
Net Assets $3,151,986
Fiscal year ending

June 2012

Fiscal year ending June

2012

PDF

990

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$1,597,638

Total Functional Expenses $1,633,121
Net income -$35,483
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $1,533,326 96.0%
Program services $59,895 3.7%
Investment income $113 0.0%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $4,304 0.3%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $124,432 7.6%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $574,192 35.2%
Other
Total Assets $2,227,769
Total Liabilities $168,285
Net Assets $2,059,484
Fiscal year ending

June 2011

Fiscal year ending June

2011

PDF

990

Total Revenue

$2,527,536

Total Functional Expenses $1,750,627
Net income $776,909
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $2,523,114 99.8%
Program services $0
Investment income $162 0.0%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $4,260 0.2%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $112,079 6.4%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $469,588 26.8%
Other
Total Assets $2,466,932
Total Liabilities $371,965
Net Assets $2,094,967
Fiscal year ending

June 2010

Fiscal year ending June

2010

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

June 2009

Fiscal year ending June

2009

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

June 2008

Fiscal year ending June

2008

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.


Last Updated: 2020-11-28 08:12