The Center for Election Science

The Center for Election Science (CES) is an American 501(c)(3) electoral reform advocacy organization.[3][4][5][6] It advocates for cardinal voting methods such as approval voting[7] and score voting.[8] Its goal is to implement approval voting in at least five cities with 50,000 people by 2022.[9]

CES argues that approval voting is superior to other proposed electoral reforms, such as ranked choice voting;[10] it says approval voting will elect more consensus winners,[11] which it contends traditional runoffs and instant-runoff ranked methods don't allow, because they eliminate candidates with broad support but low first-preference support.[12]

Center for Election Science helped pass approval voting in the city of Fargo, North Dakota, during the 2018 elections[13] and in St. Louis, Missouri in 2020,[14] with the help of St. Louis Approves,[15][16].

History

CES was founded in 2011.[17] It received a $1.8 million grant from the Open Philanthropy Project in February 2019,[18] and is considered to be a form of effective altruism.[19][20]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Meet the Team". The Center for Election Science. Retrieved 2021-03-15.
  2. ^ "Annual Report" (PDF). The Center for Election Science. Retrieved 2021-03-15.
  3. ^ "The Center for Election Science". Idealist.org. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  4. ^ Griffiths, Shawn (March 15, 2019). "10 Nonpartisan Organizations to Watch in 2020". Independent Voter News. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  5. ^ Shackford, Scott (2018-10-26). "Fargo Considers Whether to Turn Local Elections into a Voting System of Likes (and Dislikes)". Reason. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  6. ^ Cutler, Eliot R. (March 9, 2019). "Blame Democrats, not me, for Paul LePage victories". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  7. ^ "Approval Voting". The Center for Election Science. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  8. ^ "Score Voting". The Center for Election Science. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  9. ^ "STRATEGIC PLAN 2019-2021" (PDF). Center for Election Science.
  10. ^ "Approval Voting versus IRV". The Center for Election Science. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  11. ^ "Meet the reformer: Aaron Hamlin, the man behind approval voting". The Fulcrum. 2019-09-13. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  12. ^ Wiblin, Robert; Harris, Keiran (May 31, 2018). "Politics is way worse because we use an atrocious 18th century voting system. This guy has a viable plan to fix it". 80,000 Hours. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  13. ^ Piper, Kelsey (2018-11-15). "This city just approved a new election system never tried before in America". Vox. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  14. ^ "https://ballotpedia.org/St._Louis,_Missouri,_Proposition_D,_Approval_Voting_Initiative_(November_2020)". Ballotpedia. 2020-11-04. Retrieved 2021-03-15. External link in |title= (help)
  15. ^ "It's not just ranked-choice. Approval voting is also in the offing". The Fulcrum. 2019-06-17. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  16. ^ Griffiths, Shawn (November 1, 2019). "NEW POLL: 72% of St. Louis Voters Support Approval Voting Initiative". Independent Voter News. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  17. ^ "Media Kit". The Center for Election Science. Retrieved 2019-11-06.
  18. ^ "Center for Election Science Announces $1.8 Million for Approval Voting". Philanthropy News Digest (PND). March 9, 2019. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  19. ^ Greaves, Hilary; Pummer, Theron (2019-09-12). Effective Altruism: Philosophical Issues. Oxford University Press. p. 24. ISBN 9780192578303.
  20. ^ Illing, Sean (2018-12-14). "How to do good better". Vox. Retrieved 2019-11-05. Another example is voting system reform. I’ll give a shoutout to an organization you covered a few weeks ago, the Center for Election Science.