Black Alliance for Just Immigration

BAJI educates and engages African American and black immigrant communities to organize and advocate for racial, social and economic justice.

 

Description

OAKLAND, CA – EIN 271911378  baji.org

BAJI educates and engages African American and black immigrant communities to organize and advocate for racial, social and economic justice. Local BAJI Organizing Committees in New York, Georgia, California and Arizona build coalitions and initiate campaigns among communities to push for racial justice. At the local and regional level, BAJI provides training and technical assistance to partner organizations to develop leadership skills, works with faith communities to harness their prophetic voice, and initiates vibrant dialogues with African Americans and black immigrants to discover more about race, our diverse identities, racism, migration and globalization. BAJI’s flagship project is the Black Immigration Network (BIN), a national alliance that brings together black-led organizations and programs to advance just immigration policies and promote cultural shifts our communities need. The BIN kinship provides a safe, communal space for diverse black communities to connect, engage and advocate for equality and justice for all.

Wiki

Opal Tometi

Opal Tometi
OT Photo.jpg
Born (1984-08-15) August 15, 1984 (age 36)[1]
EducationUniversity of Arizona (BA)
Arizona State University (MA)
OccupationActivist, writer
Known forBlack Lives Matter, Black Alliance for Just Immigration.
Websitewww.opaltometi.org

Opal Tometi (born August 15, 1984) is an American human rights activist, writer, strategist, and community organizer. She is a co-founder of Black Lives Matter (BLM).[2] She is the former Executive Director of the United States’ first national immigrant rights organization for people of African descent, the Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI).

With BLM, Tometi aims to bring attention to the racial inequities faced by black people. She started as an active community organizer in her hometown advocating for human rights issues. She has campaigned for advancing human rights, migrant rights, and racial justice worldwide. She also worked as a case manager for survivors of domestic violence.

Early life and education

Opal Tometi is the daughter of Nigerian immigrants. She is the oldest of three children and has two younger brothers. She grew up in Phoenix, Arizona, and now lives in Brooklyn, New York. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree in History from the University of Arizona[3] and a Masters in Communication and Advocacy from Arizona State University. On May 7, 2016, she received an honorary doctor of science degree from Clarkson University.[4] Tometi is a former case manager for survivors of domestic violence and still provides community education on the issue.

Activism

Black Lives Matter

Tometi, with Patrisse Cullors and Alicia Garza, founded Black Lives Matter in 2013. Tometi is credited with setting up the social media aspects of the movement.[5]

Black Alliance for Just Immigration

Tometi worked as Co-Director and Communications Director, prior to becoming Executive Director of BAJI. Her contributions included leading organizing efforts for a rally for immigrant justice and the first Congressional briefing on black immigrants in Washington DC.[citation needed]

Other

Tometi has spoken at Susquehanna University, the Facing Race Conference of 2012, the Aspen Institute's Ideas Summit, and the Grinnell College Technology and Human Rights Symposium.[6][7][8][9] She has presented at the United Nations and has participated with the United Nations Global Forum on Migration and the Commission on the Status of Women.[6] While at The University of Arizona, Tometi volunteered with the American Civil Liberties Union. She is additionally involved with Black Organizing for Leadership and Dignity[10] and is a member of Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority, Inc.

She has appeared in several media outlets, including Glamour,[11] Essence,[12] CNN,[13] MSNBC,[14] and BET.[15] Her written works have been published by several media outlets including The Huffington Post[16] and Time.[17] Tometi continues to collaborate with communities in Los Angeles, Phoenix, New York City, Oakland, Washington D.C. and communities throughout the Southern states.

Recognition and awards

Tometi was featured as a new civil rights leader by Essence Magazine in 2014 and by the Los Angeles Times in 2013.[18] She was listed in the Root 100 list of African American Achievers between 25 and 45.[19] She was listed in the Cosmopolitan Top 100 list of extraordinary women. Along with Garza and Cullors, Tometi was named to the 2013 Time (magazine) 100 Women of the Year[20] and Politico 50 2015[21] Guide to Thinkers, Doers, and Visionaries.[22] In 2016, she was, alongside her co-founders, on Fortune's list of "World's Greatest Leaders".[23] She was awarded the Letelier-Moffitt Human Rights Award in 2017.[24] She is also featured in the Smithsonian's National Museum for African American History and Culture (NMAAHC).[25] In 2018, Tometi was featured in the Guardian's list of 200 leaders[26] who embody the work of Frederick Douglass. In 2019, along with co-authors Alicia Garza and Patrisse Khan-Cullors, Tometi received a PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award for When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir. Recently, Tometi was featured on the cover of TIME Magazine[27] and Guardian Nigeria Magazine.[28] Tometi is included in Time magazine 's 100 Most Influential People of 2020.[29]

References

  1. ^ Williams, Lauren N. (August 29, 2016). "An Influencer from the African Diaspora Who Started an American Movement". Time.
  2. ^ Dalton, Deron (May 4, 2015). "The Three Women Behind the Black Lives Matter Movement". Madame Noire. Retrieved October 15, 2015.
  3. ^ Armstrong, Lisa. "Civil Rights Leaders". Black Alliance. Retrieved October 15, 2015.
  4. ^ "Opal Tometi Awarded Clarkson University Honorary Degree". www.clarkson.edu. Clarkson University. May 7, 2016. Retrieved June 28, 2020.
  5. ^ Day, Elizabeth (July 19, 2015). "#BlackLivesMatter: the Birth of a New Civil Rights Movement". The Guardian. Retrieved October 15, 2015.
  6. ^ a b "#BlackLivesMatter Founder to Speak at Susquehanna University". Susquehanna University. September 4, 2015. Retrieved October 15, 2015.
  7. ^ Dinan, Stephen (September 30, 2015). "Black Lives Matter is Message of 'Love' for All: Founder". The Washington Times.
  8. ^ "Opal Tometi". Facing Race.
  9. ^ "Technology and Human Rights Symposium | Grinnell College". www.grinnell.edu. March 7–10, 2017. Retrieved March 11, 2017.
  10. ^ Black Organizing for Leadership and Dignity (BOLD) website.
  11. ^ Meyerson, Collier. "Meet the Women Founders of Black Lives Matter". Glamour. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  12. ^ "Black Lives Matter Founders Chosen As Glamour's "Women Of The Year" Essence". Essence. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  13. ^ "The Disruptors". Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  14. ^ "When #BlackLivesMatter we won't have to say 'black lives matter'". MSNBC.com. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  15. ^ "Community Change Agent". BET.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  16. ^ "Opal Tometi". The Huffington Post. Retrieved October 15, 2015.
  17. ^ "Opal Tometi". Time. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  18. ^ Dandes, Rick (September 21, 2015). "How Friends Tapped Power of Social Media to Start a Movement". The Daily Item. Retrieved October 15, 2015.
  19. ^ "The Root 100". The Root. Archived from the original on October 12, 2015. Retrieved October 15, 2015.
  20. ^ "Black Lives Matter Founders: 100 Women of the Year". Time. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  21. ^ "The POLITICO 50". POLITICO Magazine. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  22. ^ "Politico 50". Politico. Retrieved October 15, 2015.
  23. ^ "The Black Lives Matter Founders Are Among the World's Greatest Leaders". Fortune. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  24. ^ "The Letelier-Moffitt Human Rights Awards". Institute for Policy Studies. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  25. ^ "How Do You Tell the Story of Black America in One Museum?". Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  26. ^ Adolphe, Juweek; Morris, Sam. "The Frederick Douglass 200: the people who embody the abolitionist's spirit and work". the Guardian. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  27. ^ https://time.com/5793789/black-lives-matter-founders-100-women-of-the-year/
  28. ^ https://guardian.ng/life/on-the-cover/opal-tometi-black-lives-matter/
  29. ^ "Black Lives Matter Founders: The 100 Most Influential People of 2020". Time. Retrieved September 23, 2020.

External links

Videos

IRS data by ProPublica Nonprofit Explorer


BLACK ALLIANCE FOR JUST IMMIGRATION

BROOKLYN, NY 11216-2636 | Tax-exempt since April 2010
  • EIN: 27-1911378
  • Classification (NTEE)
    Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (Arts, Culture and Humanities)
  • Nonprofit Tax Code Designation: 501(c)(3)
    Defined as: Organizations for any of the following purposes: religious, educational, charitable, scientific, literary, testing for public safety, fostering national or international amateur sports competition (as long as it doesn’t provide athletic facilities or equipment), or the prevention of cruelty to children or animals.
  • Donations to this organization are tax deductible.
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2018

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2018

PDF

990

Full Text

990 (filed on Feb. 7, 2020)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2017

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2017

PDF

990
990

Full Text

990 (filed on April 26, 2019)

Full Filing

990 (filed on Feb. 21, 2019)

Full Filing

Raw XML

Total Revenue

$3,151,334

Total Functional Expenses $1,345,423
Net income $1,805,911
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $3,149,158 99.9%
Program services $0
Investment income $2,176 0.1%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $85,000 6.3%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $443,607 33.0%
Other
Total Assets $3,505,426
Total Liabilities $23,350
Net Assets $3,482,076
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2016

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2016

PDF

990

Full Text

990 (filed on Jan. 10, 2018)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$1,992,123

Total Functional Expenses $846,706
Net income $1,145,417
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $1,996,075 Over 100%
Program services $0
Investment income $0
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising -$3,952
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $75,000 8.9%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $190,418 22.5%
Other
Total Assets $1,700,334
Total Liabilities $24,169
Net Assets $1,676,165
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2015

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2015

PDF

990

Full Text

990 (filed on April 4, 2017)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$771,210

Total Functional Expenses $420,213
Net income $350,997
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $771,210 100%
Program services $0
Investment income $0
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $68,750 16.4%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $98,927 23.5%
Other
Total Assets $557,922
Total Liabilities $27,174
Net Assets $530,748
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2014

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2014

PDF

990

Full Text

990 (filed on Feb. 18, 2016)

Full Filing

Raw XML

990

Total Revenue

$554,434

Total Functional Expenses $465,967
Net income $88,467
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $554,434 100%
Program services $0
Investment income $0
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $60,000 12.9%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $114,245 24.5%
Other
Total Assets $209,924
Total Liabilities $30,173
Net Assets $179,751
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2013

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2013

PDF

990

Total Revenue

$321,570

Total Functional Expenses $359,724
Net income -$38,154
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $317,403 98.7%
Program services $0
Investment income $0
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $4,167 1.3%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $114,250 31.8%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $32,955 9.2%
Other
Total Assets $91,778
Total Liabilities $494
Net Assets $91,284
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2012

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2012

PDF

990

Total Revenue

$336,753

Total Functional Expenses $236,912
Net income $99,841
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $321,213 95.4%
Program services $0
Investment income $0
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $15,540 4.6%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $77,750 32.8%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $19,285 8.1%
Other
Total Assets $130,274
Total Liabilities $836
Net Assets $129,438
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2011

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2011

PDF

990-EZ

Total Revenue

$176,971

Total Functional Expenses $259,913
Net income -$82,942
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $176,395 99.7%
Program services $0
Investment income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $576 0.3%
Other
Total Assets $55,847
Total Liabilities $26,250
Net Assets $29,597

Last Updated: 2020-11-21 07:58