Coalition On Homelessness

The Coalition on Homelessness organizes homeless people and front line service providers to create permanent solutions to homelessness, while working to protect the human rights of those forced to remain on the streets.

 

Description

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – EIN 943111898  cohsf.org

The Coalition on Homelessness is a homeless advocacy and social justice organization that focuses on creating long-term solutions to homelessness, poverty, and housing issues in San Francisco, California. Founded in 1987, the Coalition has since remained a leader in homeless advocacy over the years. The Coalition on Homelessness has also founded the newspaper Street Sheet, the Community Housing Partnership, and the Western Regional Advocacy Project (WRAP).

The Coalition operates on a bottom-up grassroots organizing model, centering peer surveys and outreach. This methodology allows its advocacy and policies to be shaped by those experiencing homelessness, rather than policy makers. To ensure this independence, the Coalition has committed to refusing any form of government funding. The Coalition organizes every project through work-groups led by staff and volunteers, focusing on a variety of areas including homeless shelter, behavioral health treatment, affordable housing, and decriminalization of homelessness

Wiki

Coalition on Homelessness, San Francisco

The Coalition on Homelessness is a homeless advocacy and social justice organization that focuses on creating long-term solutions to homelessness, poverty, and housing issues in San Francisco, California. Founded in 1987, the Coalition has since remained a leader in homeless advocacy over the years. The Coalition on Homelessness has also founded the newspaper Street Sheet, the Community Housing Partnership, and the .

Organizing Philosophy

The Coalition operates on a bottom-up grassroots organizing model, centering peer surveys and outreach. This methodology allows its advocacy and policies to be shaped by those experiencing homelessness, rather than policy makers. To ensure this independence, the Coalition has committed to refusing any form of government funding. The Coalition organizes every project through work-groups led by staff and volunteers, focusing on a variety of areas including homeless shelter, behavioral health treatment, affordable housing, and decriminalization of homelessness.[1]

Origin

The Coalition was formed in 1987 by a collaboration of San Francisco service providers, homeless and formerly homeless people, and activists who were “burned-out” and “disenfranchised” by the city’s ineffectiveness at addressing the homeless crisis.[1] This group was frustrated with initiatives such as Mayor Dianne Feinstein’s “shelter-bed-and-a-sandwich” policies, which failed to address the root causes of homelessness and, according to Coalition founder Paul Boden, didn’t allow for the input of those experiencing homelessness.[4] [3] The original idea for the Coalition on Homelessness was written on a bar napkin from Harrington’s Bar and shared around places like Hospitality House and the Tenderloin Housing Clinic as a concept for an independent group with a “focus on maintaining a forum where everyone could come together and speak safely on issues of social and economic justice.”

History

The Early Years (1987–1990)

In 1987, a ragtag group of community activists and homeless folks, fed up with the lack of a response to homelessness that addressed the root causes, formed the Coalition on Homelessness. In 1989, the Street Sheet was founded, now holding the double distinction of being both the oldest continuously published street newspaper in North America, and the paper with the largest circulation.

1990s

In 1990, following the Loma Prieta Earthquake, the Coalition created the first supportive housing for homeless people in San Francisco in the form of Community Housing Partnership, providing permanent affordable supportive housing as well as offering several services such as employment opportunities, job training, and case management. In April 1992, the Coalition along with other non-profit and advocacy groups helped create the San Francisco Shelter Grievance Policy. This makes San Francisco the only place in the country where shelter residents have due process rights.  The program allows shelter residents who are asked to leave to request an internal hearing, and if the resident is unsatisfied with the outcome, they can appeal to an independent arbitrator whose decisions are binding. The program was created by Susan Mizner who was an attorney at Homeless Advocacy Project and Arnette Watson who is a formerly homeless leader at the Coalition. In 1993 they designed and advocated for the McMillan Center, a 24-hour drop-in facility for substance users, in an effort to reduce the number of overdose deaths on the street. In 1996, the Coalition fought against the city’s “Matrix Program,” an initiative of Mayor Frank Jordan’s aimed at addressing homelessness through police and criminalization, including getting 39,000 tickets dismissed in court and the eventual end of the program.[2][3] Also in 1996, the labor group People Organized to Win Employment Rights (Power) formed from the Coalition’s General Assistance Rights Union (POWER went on to create free Muni for youth), and the Coalition’s efforts helped lead to the creation of the city’s “Treatment on Demand” Initiative, which resulted in the expansion of 1,200 treatment slots and dramatically reducing the number of fatal overdoses through the creation of the DOPE project. The following year, a group of low-income mothers with the Coalition designed and secured funding for Oshun, a 24-hour drop-in treatment center for homeless families.[4]

2000s

In 2000, the Coalition on Homelessness helped form and staff the People’s Budget Collaborative, a group of community-based organizations that fights for investments in community programs in the city budget.[5] In 2002, the Coalition helped create the Mission Neighborhood Resource Center.[6] In 2005, the Coalition pushed for the creation of the San Francisco Shelter Monitoring Committee to monitor shelter conditions across the city,[7] as well as creating the Western Regional Advocacy Project (WRAP) along with other organizations throughout California, Oregon, and Washington.[8] The release of the Coalition’s 2008 report on shelter conditions–Shelter Shock–led to the first legislation in San Francisco to set minimum legal standards for homeless shelters.[9][10]

2010s

In 2014 a Coalition work-group pushed for changes to the shelter system wait list requiring people to stand outside of shelters for hours, leading to the creation of a 311 call-in system.[11] In 2015 the Coalition released two influential reports: “The Roadmap,” a five-year plan to end homelessness,[12] and “Punishing the Poorest,” a collaboration with UC Berkeley Center for Human Rights studying the criminalization of homelessness.[13] In 2012, the Coalition along with Hospitality House, started the Homeless Emergency Services Coalition which by 2019 has successfully gotten the city to reallocate almost $50 million in housing subsidies, treatment beds and homeless prevention services, resulting in over 1,700 households exiting homelessness, and thousands more having displacement staved off.  The Coalition fought with WRAP to pass “Right to Rest” laws in the California legislature in 2016 and 2018, failing both times to become law.[14]  Throughout the decade, the Coalition also fought many battles against SFPD, including blocking attempts to implement tasers, pushing for crisis intervention guidelines, transforming Use of Force standards, and stopping the building of a new jail. In 2018, they led the campaign for Proposition C, a ballot initiative to levy business taxes to fund housing and services that passed in the 2018 election. In early 2019 the Coalition was the face of a very public battle surrounding the building of a navigation center in the Embarcadero. They also collaborated with artist Leslie Dreyer on “Stolen Belonging,” a multi-media campaign to expose the department of public works for allegedly stealing and throwing away people’s belongings.

Street Sheet

The Coalition on Homelessness produces the Street Sheet, the longest continually running and most widely distributed street newspaper in the country. The Street Sheet is distributed by vendors on the street who keep all sales. Articles in the Street Sheet are written primarily by staff and volunteers at the Coalition, and are a primary way the Coalition promotes their messages and campaigns.

Current Projects

The Coalition’s projects are currently driven by two regularly meeting work-groups: Human Rights Work-group and Housing Justice Work-group. Human Rights work-group focuses on protecting the human rights and dignity of people experiencing poverty and homelessness. Housing Justice is focused on helping people get and keep homes through pushing for more low-income housing and rental subsidies and fighting against evictions and gentrification. The Coalition on Homelessness also runs a shelter advocacy program in collaboration with Eviction Defense Collaborative to defend clients in the San Francisco Shelter Grievance process.

Recognition

The Coalition on Homelessness has been widely acclaimed and recognized for their advocacy work, including the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, the State of California, and the Mental Health Association of San Francisco.

References

  1. ^ Boden, Paul (2015). House Keys not Handcuffs: Homeless Organizing, Art and Politics in San Francisco.
  2. ^ King, John; Writer, Chronicle Staff (1996-01-12). "S.F. Abandons Matrix Program / But Brown says street crime laws will be enforced". SFGate. Retrieved 2019-08-22.
  3. ^ Chao, Julie; Hatfield, Larry D.; Staff, Of the Examiner (1996-04-17). "Matrix program dies in S.F. court". SFGate. Retrieved 2019-08-22.
  4. ^ Recorder, Liana (November 1, 1997). "And The Struggle Continues". Street Sheet.
  5. ^ "July August Newsletter". graypantherssf.igc.org. Retrieved 2019-08-22.
  6. ^ "Mission Neighborhood Resource Center". Mission Neighborhood Health Center. Retrieved 2019-08-22.
  7. ^ Editor, Street Sheet (2005-05-01). "Shelter Monitoring Committee Update". Welcome To Street Sheet. Retrieved 2019-08-22.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  8. ^ "History". WRAP. Retrieved 2019-08-22.
  9. ^ "San Francisco Sets the Standard for Shelters, Cleveland Looks to Follow". Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless. Retrieved 2019-08-22.
  10. ^ Friedenbach, Jennifer (May 2007). "Shelter Shock" (PDF). The Coalition on Homelessness.
  11. ^ "Homeless People in San Francisco Can Phone in for Shelter Beds". Street Spirit. 2014-03-08. Retrieved 2019-08-22.
  12. ^ "New plan says SF could end family homelessness by 2020". The San Francisco Examiner. 2015-06-14. Retrieved 2019-08-22.
  13. ^ Alatorre, Lisa (2015). "Punishing the Poorest" (PDF).
  14. ^ "California Homeless Bill of Rights". WRAP. Retrieved 2019-08-22.

External links

Videos

IRS data by ProPublica Nonprofit Explorer


COALITION ON HOMELESSNESS

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94102-3808 | Tax-exempt since May 1995
  • EIN: 94-3111898
  • Classification (NTEE)
    Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (Human Services — Multipurpose and Other)
  • Nonprofit Tax Code Designation: 501(c)(3)
    Defined as: Organizations for any of the following purposes: religious, educational, charitable, scientific, literary, testing for public safety, fostering national or international amateur sports competition (as long as it doesn’t provide athletic facilities or equipment), or the prevention of cruelty to children or animals.
  • Donations to this organization are tax deductible.
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2018

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2018

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2017

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2017

PDF

990

Total Revenue

$524,438

Total Functional Expenses $429,330
Net income $95,108
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $406,152 77.4%
Program services $117,338 22.4%
Investment income $948 0.2%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $35,693 8.3%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $182,807 42.6%
Other
Total Assets $473,411
Total Liabilities $3,197
Net Assets $470,214
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2016

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2016

Total Revenue

$447,487

Total Functional Expenses $396,498
Net income $50,989
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $316,690 70.8%
Program services $107,717 24.1%
Investment income $1,080 0.2%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $22,000 4.9%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $33,725 8.5%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $142,704 36.0%
Other
Total Assets $376,156
Total Liabilities $2,833
Net Assets $373,323
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2015

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2015

PDF

990

Total Revenue

$489,885

Total Functional Expenses $347,219
Net income $142,666
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $395,651 80.8%
Program services $93,665 19.1%
Investment income $258 0.1%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $311 0.1%
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $25,275 7.3%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $129,671 37.3%
Other
Total Assets $321,868
Total Liabilities $1,338
Net Assets $320,530
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2014

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2014

PDF

990

Total Revenue

$432,901

Total Functional Expenses $340,326
Net income $92,575
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $326,364 75.4%
Program services $106,317 24.6%
Investment income $220 0.1%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $22,772 6.7%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $101,940 30.0%
Other
Total Assets $195,438
Total Liabilities $17,243
Net Assets $178,195
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2013

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2013

PDF

990

Total Revenue

$291,206

Total Functional Expenses $298,710
Net income -$7,504
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $231,985 79.7%
Program services $59,221 20.3%
Investment income $0
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $21,750 7.3%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $95,821 32.1%
Other
Total Assets $100,452
Total Liabilities $16,745
Net Assets $83,707
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2012

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2012

PDF

990

Total Revenue

$250,907

Total Functional Expenses $282,806
Net income -$31,899
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $198,824 79.2%
Program services $52,083 20.8%
Investment income $0
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $21,750 7.7%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $81,425 28.8%
Other
Total Assets $99,738
Total Liabilities $13,136
Net Assets $86,602
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2011

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2011

PDF

990

Total Revenue

$368,515

Total Functional Expenses $327,128
Net income $41,387
Notable sources of revenue Percent of total revenue
Contributions $272,640 74.0%
Program services $95,830 26.0%
Investment income $45 0.0%
Bond proceeds $0
Royalties $0
Rental property income $0
Net fundraising $0
Sales of assets $0
Net inventory sales $0
Other revenue $0
Notable expenses Percent of total expenses
Executive compensation $21,750 6.6%
Professional fundraising fees $0
Other salaries and wages $118,010 36.1%
Other
Total Assets $125,134
Total Liabilities $7,966
Net Assets $117,168
Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2010

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2010

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2009

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2009

PDF

990-EZ

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2007

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2007

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2006

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2006

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2005

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2005

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2004

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2004

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2003

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2003

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2002

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2002

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.

Fiscal year ending

Dec. 2001

Fiscal year ending Dec.

2001

PDF

990

Form 990 documents available

Extracted filing data is not available for this tax period, but Form 990 documents are available for download.


Last Updated: 2020-11-28 08:16